GAA – The Way of Life…

17th, April 2015

Earlier this year, we launched a partnership with Ulster GAA, offering unrivalled private medical care to GAA members and their families. It got us thinking how much GAA means to people in Ulster and beyond.

Earlier this year, we launched a partnership with Ulster GAA, offering unrivalled private medical care to GAA members and their families. It got us thinking how much GAA means to people in Ulster and beyond. 

There are a few things that make this country and us that little bit different to the rest of the world. The size of our island and its location at the edge of the Atlantic, with next stop the USA, gives us a mind-set that may be a little mixed up - we look in one direction and see the larger island of Great Britain, and the other way – nothing, it is empty.

We are friendly, but feisty. We are serene and excitable. We love winning. We cope with losing.

The GAA captures a lot of what it is to be Irish. Those that don’t get it, don’t get it. The team spirit. Playing our own sport, that is unique to the island and the people from the island. The challenge of playing top class sport, but staying amateur. The commitment to training, and travelling. The discovery of places in Ireland that you would never go if it weren’t for the game. Meeting people in those places year after year, from when you first played against them to when you retire together with a pint after your last match. The skills of football, hurling and camogie. The social life in the city, town or village that revolves around the club. The support for the team at every level. The calls of good luck from the people on the street who know about the big game at the weekend. The chat about the team, the fitness of the players, the opposition, their danger man, our star and his form. The flags, the stickers, the scarfs out the windows of the cars, the colours on the lampposts, the face painting. The rivalry, the banter from the guy from Kerry who, let’s be fair, has a lot to banter about.

Match day. The craic. Running onto the field, the excitement, the energy, the noise. Seeing your friends, your family, your neighbours and strangers coming together and supporting the team.

The playing. The skills, the tackles, the good catch or hit, the missed interception. The goal, the celebration. The time going faster if you’re winning, going slower if you’re losing. The joy or despair.
The chat after the match, the lads or ladies that are injured and need attention. The analysis. The chat the next day. The next fixture.

Find out what others are saying about the GAA here

Photo Credit: https://www.pinterest.com/3fivetwogroup/what-does-gaa-mean-to-me/


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